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Rank: Driver's Permit
#1 Posted : Saturday, July 2, 2016 8:39:55 AM(UTC)
Let's say you have only one option to correct excessive oversteer issues with your ride - what's your upgrade / adjustment?

Edited by user Saturday, July 2, 2016 8:43:45 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Rank: C-Class Racing License
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#2 Posted : Saturday, July 2, 2016 9:54:53 AM(UTC)
Softer roll bar at the rear, or slightly less tire pressure. I'd be careful with lowering the spring stiffness too much. Then try messing with the rear diff. It might make mire sense to send power up in smoke rather than it breaking the rear loose.

Just my opinion, but I'm akways open to reading other people's thoughts on this.
Rank: C-Class Racing License
#3 Posted : Saturday, July 2, 2016 10:56:04 AM(UTC)
Assuming you have a relatively good setup as such I probably would just adjust bump and/or rebound settings, if I haven't remedied the issue by the time I feel they are getting to soft/stiff then I will start looking at other aspects, diff, ARB'S etc. As for tyre pressure I personally wouldn't touch that I like to keep my tyre pressures even all around.
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#4 Posted : Saturday, July 2, 2016 12:18:11 PM(UTC)
Def raising aero values or maybe lowering rear anti roll bar.
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#5 Posted : Saturday, July 2, 2016 12:50:59 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: RP theZOGster Go to Quoted Post
Softer roll bar at the rear, or slightly less tire pressure. I'd be careful with lowering the spring stiffness too much. Then try messing with the rear diff. It might make mire sense to send power up in smoke rather than it breaking the rear loose.

Just my opinion, but I'm akways open to reading other people's thoughts on this.


Thanks. How about softening / hardening of front / rear springs? Would you say altering the roll bar of rear has greater affect for reducing oversteer?
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#6 Posted : Saturday, July 2, 2016 1:03:12 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: Boost Incomming Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: RP theZOGster Go to Quoted Post
Softer roll bar at the rear, or slightly less tire pressure. I'd be careful with lowering the spring stiffness too much. Then try messing with the rear diff. It might make mire sense to send power up in smoke rather than it breaking the rear loose.

Just my opinion, but I'm akways open to reading other people's thoughts on this.


Thanks. How about softening / hardening of front / rear springs? Would you say altering the roll bar of rear has greater affect for reducing oversteer?


Anybody here used the diff reduce over or understeer?
Rank: B-Class Racing License
#7 Posted : Saturday, July 2, 2016 1:23:33 PM(UTC)
Where is the oversteer occuring? Corner entry, mid-corner, corner exit?
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#8 Posted : Saturday, July 2, 2016 1:30:15 PM(UTC)
If you make the front end stiffer you'll still have oversteer, but you'll just have more understeer to deal with.

It's my understanding that you will always have either oversteer or understeer. Your tuning only balances those two negatives, or makes it more manageable depending on your preferences. You can make a car more neutral (equal oversteer and understeer) but those are each very subjective handling traits. You may prefer more oversteer or understeer than someone else, which is why tuning can be so hit or miss.

You either adapt to the car's strengths with your driving, or you tune out those undersirable traits to better suit your driving tendencies. We all drive differently.
Rank: Driver's License
#9 Posted : Saturday, July 2, 2016 3:09:21 PM(UTC)
I would soften the roll bars as well. My knowledge to try and adjust bump and damping isn't enough yet.
Without struggle, There is no progess...



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#10 Posted : Saturday, July 2, 2016 3:55:01 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: RP theZOGster Go to Quoted Post
If you make the front end stiffer you'll still have oversteer, but you'll just have more understeer to deal with.

It's my understanding that you will always have either oversteer or understeer. Your tuning only balances those two negatives, or makes it more manageable depending on your preferences. You can make a car more neutral (equal oversteer and understeer) but those are each very subjective handling traits. You may prefer more oversteer or understeer than someone else, which is why tuning can be so hit or miss.

You either adapt to the car's strengths with your driving, or you tune out those undersirable traits to better suit your driving tendencies. We all drive differently.


This is true.

Yet, good tuning can also find the optimal grip for any car, optimal braking and just that awesome balance we all seek.

They's that magic number for every car, it's just finding it.

Back on topic, I find the ARB's the most effective way and quickest way to balance handling, yet I think these should be the last resort as suspension and alignment should be the first starting point to determine the handling characteristics of your tune.
Rank: S-Class Racing License
#11 Posted : Saturday, July 2, 2016 8:21:21 PM(UTC)
fatter rears
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#12 Posted : Sunday, July 3, 2016 1:24:24 AM(UTC)
Thanks, I too would have thought the suspension would be the first point of tuning for handing characteristics, but understand it is subjective.

Is there a general stiffness setting between front / rear springs that would likely dial out or induce oversteer? I.e. Front softer than rear increases oversteer? Any general rule? Stiffer tail likely to induce oversteer?

Originally Posted by: HLR Toffo Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: RP theZOGster Go to Quoted Post
If you make the front end stiffer you'll still have oversteer, but you'll just have more understeer to deal with.

It's my understanding that you will always have either oversteer or understeer. Your tuning only balances those two negatives, or makes it more manageable depending on your preferences. You can make a car more neutral (equal oversteer and understeer) but those are each very subjective handling traits. You may prefer more oversteer or understeer than someone else, which is why tuning can be so hit or miss.

You either adapt to the car's strengths with your driving, or you tune out those undersirable traits to better suit your driving tendencies. We all drive differently.


This is true.

Yet, good tuning can also find the optimal grip for any car, optimal braking and just that awesome balance we all seek.

They's that magic number for every car, it's just finding it.

Back on topic, I find the ARB's the most effective way and quickest way to balance handling, yet I think these should be the last resort as suspension and alignment should be the first starting point to determine the handling characteristics of your tune.


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#13 Posted : Sunday, July 3, 2016 2:10:36 AM(UTC)
The general rule is that higher numbers on rear for most settings induce oversteer.

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User is suspended until 11/28/2043 4:39:51 AM(UTC)
#14 Posted : Sunday, July 3, 2016 10:24:40 PM(UTC)
I would adjust to the feel of the car and adapt in it first before tuning it use my ability to try getting around it. and I'll say you can't just change one thing to fix over and understeer the whole cars tune must be adjusted to rebalance it.

Edited by user Sunday, July 3, 2016 10:25:59 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

More then 99.9% of the forza community use some form of assist to drive and that right there is why the lobby racing blows.
Rank: Driver's License
#15 Posted : Thursday, July 7, 2016 12:40:19 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: Boost Incomming Go to Quoted Post
Let's say you have only one option to correct excessive oversteer issues with your ride - what's your upgrade / adjustment?


Is it on or off throttle understeer?
Rank: Driver's Permit
#16 Posted : Thursday, July 7, 2016 2:03:11 PM(UTC)
Oversteer = front grip > rear grip
Understeer = front grip < rear grip

Softer settings transfer weight slower but increase spring compression.
More weight = more grip ( to a point )
Less weight = less grip ( " )

All those charts are actually this simple.

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#17 Posted : Friday, July 8, 2016 7:17:20 PM(UTC)
Adjust ARBs. That'll result in significant changes in handling. Often increasing/decreasing one slider by 5 clicks can net huge gains.

If the rear feels ok but the front is turning in too much and causing the car to oversteer, increase front ARB.

If the car is turning in good and feels stable, but rear is all over the place, drop the rear ARBs.

Modest adjustments are good, but crazy settings like 10/30 or 30/10 do work.

I would only do aero if after getting the balance ok you notice that car is unable to hold as much speed through corners like comparable cars/builds.
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#18 Posted : Wednesday, August 3, 2016 5:30:05 AM(UTC)
what i like to do is change the springs, if that dosent work, the roll bars, and then the aero. big values can really help
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#19 Posted : Friday, November 18, 2016 3:51:47 PM(UTC)
this has actually helped me. SOOOOOOO glad i found this thread
Rank: Driver's Permit
#20 Posted : Thursday, October 3, 2019 9:54:54 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: HLR Toffo Go to Quoted Post
The general rule is that higher numbers on rear for most settings induce oversteer.


This has got to be the best bit of advice for me. I’ve got a few great cars that have horrible oversteer and this made all the difference. 👍

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