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Rank: Driver's Permit
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#276 Posted : Friday, June 27, 2014 12:43:48 AM(UTC)
Great guide, you've just convinced me to ditch all the assists, can't wait to start anew tonight
Rank: Driver's Permit
#277 Posted : Friday, June 27, 2014 8:57:18 AM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: Speed Runner 10 Go to Quoted Post
Thank you for taking the time to compile such a comprehensive guide to better driving. Theres a lot of good advice in there.

A couple of small points, however.

It is statistically impossible for everyone following your guide to be in the top 1%!

Secondly I personally know my strengths and weaknesses within the confines of a driving game. If i followed your advice without exception I would NOT be faster than I am now.

Its rather hypocritical to decry all the assists then say its ok to not use sim steering because you can't handle the twitchy responses. The responses are more realistic than under 'normal' steering. Why don't you follow your own advice and switch it off, get slower and learn how to master this essential skill? You can't have it both ways.

Running Rivals without tyre wear? No pressure then!

And with your depth of experience why are you only at tier 1?

Everybody is different. There are many ways to the top.

I agree
Rank: D-Class Racing License
 1 user liked this post.
#278 Posted : Sunday, July 13, 2014 4:54:57 PM(UTC)
Now that I've been doing this for awhile, I wanted to add a couple of thoughts to this thread:

1. I still maintain that for a beginning driver who is looking to work their way into the Top 1% on leaderboards, this is the best guide available to help them get there. If you disagree, show me a better one. When I started, I had not touched a racing game in nearly 10 years and was terrified at the thought of driving without any assists. Now, I can confidently state that I am a top 1% driver (at least in D-B Class) and starting to make a habit of top half of top 1%. Jawshe's guide, along with running a lot of laps (and there is no substitute for that) were very instrumental in me getting there. So, thank you, Jawshe.

2. The focus of my other notes are what I believe will help a driver start to go from top 1% to top half of top 1% and beyond. I believe this is the case because it coincides with my personal experience. For awhile, I was getting frustrated because I seemed to hit a plateau. I just seemed to be stuck at the bottom of the top 1% and couldn't do better. Now, I'm finding that I've made some good progress. I have this one rival who used to routinely be 4-5 seconds ahead of me. Now, we are either close or I'm beating him on a regular basis. How did I get there? Glad you asked:

(BTW, the following is mainly for people who are not doing their own tuning. If you are doing your own tuning, it may not be of much use.)

3. The most important thing in choosing tunes is to find a tuner who meshes with your driving style. Do NOT choose a car/tune simply because it is at the top of the LB. There are several great drivers/tuners whose tunes, to be honest, are useless to me. Why? Because they don't work with my driving style. What caused my latest breakthrough? Well, certainly practice (which, as I said, cannot be substituted) but, also, discovering a tuner whose tunes work very well for me. In my case, it was tunes from the FRS team. They work great for me. They may not work for you. Look around until you find somebody that works for you and it will feel like a completely different driving experience. You will see lap times shrink and your name make great strides on the LB.

4. It's no secret that some long-time racers disagree with some points in the guide. One of the most contentious points seemed to be use of some of the assists (in particular, TCS). Some of the long-time racers disagreed with Jawshe's "hardcore" advocacy and I think some took it personally as though he was insulting them for choosing to use some assists. Well, this guide and thread aren't about insulting people - they are about making new drivers better. So, here is my answer:

I don't think Jawshe's suggestion about learning to drive without TCS is necessarily a bad one. However, as you progress, you will discover something very important - OFTEN, THE TUNES YOU CHOOSE WILL BE DESIGNED TO HAVE TCS TURNED ON. This is important. A good rule of thumb - if the person who created your tune is using TCS, you probably should, too. If you pride yourself on being "hardcore", then, that is your choice. But, if the tune is designed with TCS in mind, you will be significantly faster with it on.

Again, I offer my thoughts because they mirror my experience and like Jawshe, I hope they can help improve the driving experience of others. Keep racing - there is no substitute.

AX

Edited by user Sunday, July 13, 2014 5:10:18 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Rank: Racing Legend
#279 Posted : Sunday, July 13, 2014 8:26:14 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: Anubis Xeper Go to Quoted Post


3. The most important thing in choosing tunes is to find a tuner who meshes with your driving style. Do NOT choose a car/tune simply because it is at the top of the LB. There are several great drivers/tuners whose tunes, to be honest, are useless to me. Why? Because they don't work with my driving style. What caused my latest breakthrough? Well, certainly practice (which, as I said, cannot be substituted) but, also, discovering a tuner whose tunes work very well for me. In my case, it was tunes from the FRS team. They work great for me. They may not work for you. Look around until you find somebody that works for you and it will feel like a completely different driving experience. You will see lap times shrink and your name make great strides on the LB.



I would like to propose a counter argument to this but also state that I don't think there is a right or wrong. It may depend on how willing or able a driver is to change.

I hit a plateau with my own tuning. I was stubborn in a way but also enjoyed doing everything from go to whoa myself. I was obviously tuning for the way I was driving. Some recent improvements came from using top tunes (#1 tunes and top tens) and learning how those tunes needed to be driven.

Driving style is a term that (no offence meant to anyone including myself lol) can be used to describe driving flaws. Please note I said "can". If I have my lines all wrong and turn in too early or too late or are too aggressive or too lazy in turning or whatever then tuning to fit in with that may be limiting progress. It may depend on whether you are aiming to get the best times out of your current skill level or are trying to lift your skill level.

My recent changes to driving include holding on to the brake trigger for much shorter periods than before and letting the car carry more speed. The top tunes just seem to flow around turns carrying more speed than I realised was possible.

Challenge yourself to learn how a number 1 tune needs to be driven and in so doing you may realise a driving flaw you have and maybe even a tuning flaw.

EDIT: FRS does have some top tunes. I have the scars to prove it at Road Atlanta Club in S class lol

Edited by user Sunday, July 13, 2014 8:29:58 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

I blame the ants.
Rank: Racing Legend
#280 Posted : Sunday, July 13, 2014 8:34:09 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: Speed Runner 10 Go to Quoted Post

Secondly I personally know my strengths and weaknesses within the confines of a driving game. If i followed your advice without exception I would NOT be faster than I am now.



Try it and see.

To get quicker we need to change something.

Whether it be Jawshe's guide or something else it needs to be something different than what we did to set our current best time.
I blame the ants.
Rank: D-Class Racing License
#281 Posted : Sunday, July 13, 2014 9:09:38 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: SatNiteEduardo Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Anubis Xeper Go to Quoted Post


3. The most important thing in choosing tunes is to find a tuner who meshes with your driving style. Do NOT choose a car/tune simply because it is at the top of the LB. There are several great drivers/tuners whose tunes, to be honest, are useless to me. Why? Because they don't work with my driving style. What caused my latest breakthrough? Well, certainly practice (which, as I said, cannot be substituted) but, also, discovering a tuner whose tunes work very well for me. In my case, it was tunes from the FRS team. They work great for me. They may not work for you. Look around until you find somebody that works for you and it will feel like a completely different driving experience. You will see lap times shrink and your name make great strides on the LB.



I would like to propose a counter argument to this but also state that I don't think there is a right or wrong. It may depend on how willing or able a driver is to change.

I hit a plateau with my own tuning. I was stubborn in a way but also enjoyed doing everything from go to whoa myself. I was obviously tuning for the way I was driving. Some recent improvements came from using top tunes (#1 tunes and top tens) and learning how those tunes needed to be driven.

Driving style is a term that (no offence meant to anyone including myself lol) can be used to describe driving flaws. Please note I said "can". If I have my lines all wrong and turn in too early or too late or are too aggressive or too lazy in turning or whatever then tuning to fit in with that may be limiting progress. It may depend on whether you are aiming to get the best times out of your current skill level or are trying to lift your skill level.

My recent changes to driving include holding on to the brake trigger for much shorter periods than before and letting the car carry more speed. The top tunes just seem to flow around turns carrying more speed than I realised was possible.

Challenge yourself to learn how a number 1 tune needs to be driven and in so doing you may realise a driving flaw you have and maybe even a tuning flaw.

EDIT: FRS does have some top tunes. I have the scars to prove it at Road Atlanta Club in S class lol


That's a fair point, Ed. I most certainly have flaws. And, there is a certain chicken/egg dynamic at work. How much of it is the tune and how much of it is me getting better as I started using those tunes? I honestly don't know. I do know that, for me, many of the FRS tunes have just clicked. This morning I was using FRS Jose's Lotus Elan C Class around Catalunya and it just felt awesome. I was in the 2:06 range and I know there was more to be had. Ironically, the Elan was a car I had pretty much left for dead because I could never seem to work well with it.

As much as I dig the FRS tunes, I can use some others. ERS Johnson had a B Class Toyota Trueno that was working very well for me, too. On the other hand, some other perennial LB toppers have tunes that will cause me to spin halfway around the track. Does that mean I have issues with throttle control? Probably. But, at some point, frustration outweighs the value of the teaching moment. I value constant improvement but I also want some enjoyment, too.

AX

Rank: Driver's Permit
#282 Posted : Tuesday, July 15, 2014 4:26:34 AM(UTC)
good read, "jawshe tips and entertainment" haha
Rank: S-Class Racing License
#283 Posted : Monday, September 8, 2014 10:30:19 AM(UTC)
Bumped for those looking for tips
Rank: Driver's Permit
#284 Posted : Monday, September 8, 2014 11:08:31 AM(UTC)
I don't really agree with some of the tips. Plus, the fact is that not all car's have a pedal actuated clutch. So In general, even though it's not faster to, I race with just the manual turned on. If anything there should be an option to use the clutch option, but for it only to work on car's that actually have a clutch pedal. For example, a car with a dogbox transmission will need a pedal to be used to make it go from a standstill, but afterwards you don't touch it at all. So adding that would be THE best choice in my opinion.Also, there isn't any fast racing lines, just the one's you feel comfortable with. If you limit yourself to being fast using only one line, you will never be able to race and be a podium player. Braking should be done in whatever manner you feel fastest going into a corner. When you have a car in front and they decide to brake mid corner, no amount of straight line braking is gonna help. So learning to be equally fast taking any line and learning to brake at any point during a corner without losing momentum is essential. Best way for me to practice is by test driving my cars. There is no replay and there are no cars, which makes it easier to get used to some driving dynamics that most people aren't aware of. Sim steering is KING in my book. The reason being that twitching he mentioned, it provides an element of weight management that will work wonders once you master it. There are a few more, but in all honesty it all comes down to how much effort you put into this game. If you came into Forza 5 from Horizon, then just leave it at basic settings and enjoy yourself. If your like me and you've played every single game and have gotten every single gold trophy as practice for rivals mode and multiplayer, then take it from me and just do you and don't look to forums for technique. Find the speed, technique yourself and use your faults to get you where you never thought you could get before.
Rank: Racing Permit
#285 Posted : Sunday, March 1, 2015 3:45:09 AM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: Speed Runner 10 Go to Quoted Post
...I personally know my strengths and weaknesses within the confines of a driving game. If i followed your advice without exception I would NOT be faster than I am now.

Its rather hypocritical to decry all the assists then say its ok to not use sim steering because you can't handle the twitchy responses. The responses are more realistic than under 'normal' steering. Why don't you follow your own advice and switch it off, get slower and learn how to master this essential skill? You can't have it both ways.

Running Rivals without tyre wear? No pressure then!

And with your depth of experience why are you only at tier 1?

Everybody is different. There are many ways to the top.


...wow...

With an attitude like that honestly just enjoy single player and leave rivals and online for the rest of us.
Rank: S-Class Racing License
 1 user liked this post.
#286 Posted : Monday, March 2, 2015 11:29:16 AM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: IckyDoody **** oo Go to Quoted Post
Note: For the purpose of this post, I will define 'accelerating' as it is used in layman driver terminology - giving the car gas to make it go faster.

Nice OP, Jawshee. I agree with the sentiment that this forum could used a sticky on driving theory (as well as one on racecraft/etiquette/rules of racing). It sure would have saved me a lot of trial and error. With that said, I think you have missed the most important tip for beginners and novice drivers:

Avoid accelerating from turn in to the apex! I believe that accelerating to the apex is the biggest and most common mistake that drivers outside of the top 1000 make.


-Why is it common? Because it is the easiest way to take a turn. You can come in slow. You don't need to worry too much about turn-in timing or angle since you can easily use the throttle to modulate your speed and turning arc.


- Why is it a big mistake? Because it's slow, duh. Let's compare driver A, who uses the throttle to modulate speed and angle between turn in and the apex... and driver B, who makes one move with the wheel (or stick) to turn in and then coasts to the apex.
1) Driver A has to brake earlier than driver B. This might only affect lap times by a couple or hundredths of a second per turn, which isn't a big deal.
2) Driver A takes Longer to get from turn-in to the apex. Why? Acceleration taxes the car's traction. Between turn in and the apex, you want all of your traction to go towards turning. A vehicle with zero net acceleration (or deceleration) can take an arc at a faster speed . Thus driver B has a greater average speed from turn-in to apex. Again, this time difference is only on the order of hundredths of a second but the speed difference makes a much bigger dent on time, which brings me to the next point:
3) Driver A carries less speed through the apex! How much speed? 1 maybe 2 miles per hour? Not much, you say? Well, an extra 1 mile per hour over a mid length straight will save you tenths of a second!
4) Driver A is often forced into a worse exit angle/earlier apex. When driver A accelerates before the apex, he increases his turning radius which pushes the car's nose outwards, in the direction of the track-out. Meanwhile, driver B's nose points more and more down the next straight as he approaches the apex. This means that driver B can get on the gas earlier.


Which leads me to attempt to succinctly answer a very debatable question:

What makes a driver fast? In my opinion, the biggest determining factor is Corner exit speed! For the purposes of this post, I will define 'corner exit speed' as the speed the driver reaches as he passes the end of the track out. Actually, relative corner exit speed can be judged at any point in the straight past the track out, though it is important to note that speed at apex does not give you an accurate gauge of corner exit speed since angle and position at apex are a also a big factor since they determine how fast the driver can get the power on.

I believe that almost everything that a driver does to get faster actually revolves around improving corner exit speed. Car control, finding the limits of your car, knowing the track, timing (specifically turn-in timing)... All of these are slaves to corner exit speed. Which leads me to emphasize :

Turn-in to apex is by far the biggest determining factor in corner exit speed!
So how should we go about turning in? I have already discounted the 'accelerate to apex' approach, below are the approaches that fast drivers use:

Method 1-Coast- Brake straight (more on this later), release the brakes, coast for a moment (less than a tenth of a second) to ensure the wheels have stopped chattering, turn in with one movement of the wheel, coast to the apex, power out from the apex. The main advantage this method has over option 2 is that your turning radius will naturally decrease (because wind resistance and engine drag are slowing you down). This will give you a better exit angle at the apex (pointed more down the line).


Method 2-Maintain speed- Brake straight, apply enough power to maintain constant speed/counteract wind resistance between turn-in and apex. This works well for cars with corner-entry oversteer since it keeps the car weighted towards the rear, improving grip in the rear.


Method 3-Light trail braking- Brake straight, apply just enough brake pressure from turn-in to apex to keep the front end weighted. This can help counteract understeer.


Method 4-Moderate trail braking- Brake straight, but continue with moderate braking as you turn-in. It allows you to brake later at the expense of corner-exit speed.


So which is best? It depends, though I will say that it seems the top leaderboard drivers use a combination of one and four. Also, it's important to note that these methods are ideals to be strived for on most (the vast majority) of turns. Some sweepers might require you to accelerate/coast/repeat. Also, sometimes (more often for some of us) you will miss time your turn in and you will have to do some accelerating mid-turn to keep a reasonable line... It's just important make the distinction that you've made a mistake so it doesn't become a habit.




On braking late and braking straight

Jawshee has established that you get the most out of your brakes if you brake in a straight line, but I think that it's worth noting that you need to be straight before you brake. If you make adjustments, even minor ones, just before braking then you may enter the braking zone with your car weighted slightly to the left or right. You want to avoid this since it may increase your stopping time. A major goal in braking is to set yourself up for a consistent turn-in point and speed, you can't accomplish this without achieving consistent braking distances.

I mentioned before that braking late saves very little time, maybe 2 hundredths of a second. It is important to note that from a racecraft perspective, 2 hundredths of a second at the end of a long straight can mean the difference between keeping your position and losing it to the guy in your rearview. Why, because at 160 mph for 2 hundredths of a second, your opponent might cover a hundred yards, possibly giving him the chance to legally gain position on your inside before you get to your turn-in point.



A few other tips:
-Start wide whenever possible
-hit every apex point and every trackout. For a standard 90 degree/constant-radius turn, missing the apex by 1 foot will cause a 1 mph decrease in corner exit speed.
-Choose very specific apex spots. Maybe the size of a tennis ball. I think it has to do with how the mind works, but it definitely helps with turn-in timing.


... More to come later, probably.


This, after the OP, is the next step.
Loved the OP, still do, and agree with it whole heartedly as a great way TO LEARN how a car handles and what it's doing before setting it up to compete. You guys should do this before you build and tune it too right?

So shut it all off, take it around the track, and then decide IF it really warrants/needs TCS. Most of the rest of the aids aren't really an issue unless you're starting out.

But this post is so dead on. Maintaining, or carrying speed through the corner, and more importantly exit speed itself IS hugely important. It's that next step after you've worked through the OP and have a handle on the car.

And step three is how to handle the corner when everyone's in your way, running your line, or pressuring you as you enter that corner.

That's the next step that needs written...

2Old4Forza
Rank: A-Class Racing License
 2 users liked this post.
#287 Posted : Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:34:03 AM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: larrlzz Go to Quoted Post
I don't really agree with some of the tips. Plus, the fact is that not all car's have a pedal actuated clutch. So In general, even though it's not faster to, I race with just the manual turned on. If anything there should be an option to use the clutch option, but for it only to work on car's that actually have a clutch pedal. For example, a car with a dogbox transmission will need a pedal to be used to make it go from a standstill, but afterwards you don't touch it at all. So adding that would be THE best choice in my opinion.Also, there isn't any fast racing lines, just the one's you feel comfortable with. If you limit yourself to being fast using only one line, you will never be able to race and be a podium player. Braking should be done in whatever manner you feel fastest going into a corner. When you have a car in front and they decide to brake mid corner, no amount of straight line braking is gonna help. So learning to be equally fast taking any line and learning to brake at any point during a corner without losing momentum is essential. Best way for me to practice is by test driving my cars. There is no replay and there are no cars, which makes it easier to get used to some driving dynamics that most people aren't aware of. Sim steering is KING in my book. The reason being that twitching he mentioned, it provides an element of weight management that will work wonders once you master it. There are a few more, but in all honesty it all comes down to how much effort you put into this game. If you came into Forza 5 from Horizon, then just leave it at basic settings and enjoy yourself. If your like me and you've played every single game and have gotten every single gold trophy as practice for rivals mode and multiplayer, then take it from me and just do you and don't look to forums for technique. Find the speed, technique yourself and use your faults to get you where you never thought you could get before.


You are wrong on so many levels here.

"there isn't any fast racing lines, just the one's you feel comfortable with" - This is completely false, there is always a fastest line around the track. Sure, you may not always be able to take the fastest or optimal line but there is one. Think about it this way, if you are in a serious race that does qualifiying and you qualify in front and manage to get a good start during the race and a good first corner, essentially the rest of the race you should be able to run the "fastest" racing line.

"Braking should be done in whatever manner you feel fastest going into a corner. When you have a car in front and they decide to brake mid corner, no amount of straight line braking is gonna help." Braking should be done to optimize your line through the upcoming corners regardless of in race or hotlapping. It should be done so you are hitting the apex and carrying the most speed out of a corner. I am referring to high end racing with quality people, not dealing with the beginner lobby. There should be noone breaking mid corner etc. Sure some people are gonig to brake a little bit earleir and some people a little later but have smart race craft give youself enough space until you know your opponent, exploit their weakness, whether it be a certain turns brake point or a certain corner exit, or some advantage your vehicle has (acceleration, grip etc.)

"...then take it from me and just do you and don't look to forums for technique." although some of the forum advice needs to be muddled through for the good and bad advice (ahem). If you seek to improve the forums are a good place to start. there are many quick players who still keep an eye on the forums and are willing to give advice, add to friends and run laps with constructive information (apposed to going into the hoppers, seeing the odd good player and then having him dust you and other than the first few corners you never see them again.) people that are willing to help with tunes, help testing tunes etc. There are very helpful people out there and when you seek advice from a few you may get something you pick up on.

Edited by user Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:34:45 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified


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#288 Posted : Wednesday, March 4, 2015 9:55:04 AM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: larrlzz Go to Quoted Post
Find the speed, technique yourself and use your faults to get you where you never thought you could get before.


Umm, what? Use your faults to get you where you never thought you could get before.... LOL, yeah, out in the grass or upside down against the wall.

Why reinvent the wheel? Ask someone who's been there and can save you some time and frustration.

Only the student can hope to beat the teacher...


2Old4Forza
Rank: Racing Permit
#289 Posted : Saturday, March 7, 2015 6:20:32 PM(UTC)
I'm just going to go ahead and post this here...

if anyone would like some techniques taught in-game. I'm here for free advice. I don't have Forza 5... yet. Honestly, felt Horizon more in my gut. So I'm on XboxOne in Horizon2. But I plan on getting Forza 5 fairly soon. Easily by the end of the summer.


Just be ready for the price you pay. Honestly basic entry is building a 1991 JDM Icon B-spec Miata with the upgrades I recommend and then I give you my tune free (costs like $20,000 I think for all said and done - $10,000 in the tires!) Then I show you all of the above beginner, intermediate, and advanced techniques. How they apply in real-world. How they apply and work in-game. For example, in Horizon 2, caster and camber act quite a bit tamer than in real life, and one can "go for broke" without breaking the car. Then as one builds up confidence and develops their actual driving style - I'll help you understand tuning, the physics behind it spoken by a driver, not a scientist (I keep it simple-ish), and I'll help you develop the Miata to drive the way YOU want it to for YOUR driving style and line.

Then, if you want, and are having fun, we can run bigger RWD cars, go to ME cars, AWD/FE, AWD/ME, RWD/RE, AWD/RE, or FWD. Happily. Honestly, I'd love to help "break" the leaderboards. Driving hard, digging deep (into yourself), and driving clean = fast lap times.

For example, I'm trying to break into the 13 minute mark (aka, 13:something) in a relatively stock Shelby Daytona Coupe, Dino Ferrari, and GT MkII. All I do, is add some downforce aero, and racing tires. Flywheel if they need it. That's IT. And me and my friends having done this. Thinking about the EPIC run I had in my Daytona against a same-specc'd out Ferrari GTO (basically the LeMans race continued out into the country) was absolutely amazing.

anyone want to get there? Feel free to hit me up. 20+ years experience in both gaming cars and real-world. And as I said, it's a game. It's for FUN. So happily will share any and all. Also, Jawshe's OP... MONEY. Literally. And there's plenty in here that's just as good.

Edited by user Saturday, March 7, 2015 6:23:52 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Rank: Driver's Permit
#290 Posted : Saturday, March 21, 2015 11:58:59 PM(UTC)
Hi everyone, I wanted to post a thank you for all the help you are offering here to become a better driver.

After all I am looking forward to learn driving without assists, however I will switch them off one by one. Reason for this is:
- I want to have fun; of course I might learn the hard way faster, however I am not aiming at the top 1% nor do I want to learn it the least time possible. Might be different if I could practice all day long, but that is not possible if you have a job and a family.
- I want to learn the effects of having a distinct assist turned off or on. If I turn off all together it might be hard to tell which I want to turn on again if being too frustrated.

First I did was turning off automatic shifting. It took me very little time to get used to it. This was because I recognized that it is much easier to drive corners once you know which gear you should choose for distinct corners. Automatic shifting will shift accidentally very very often. You will not recognize it though until you try manual shifting.

Now that I am fine with shifting I will turn off ABS and check first what it does to my cars and second how to be faster without it.

One final question about camera perspective: Which do you use/recommend or is this just preference? The cockpit view is ultra cool and realistic, though it has the disadvantage of losing a clean view of the track ahead. I prefer the front cameras, as I feel to be closer to the road. The cameras behind/outside the car a nice to see your car design, however I unlearnt using them, as I feel to win a fraction of a second if the camera is in front of the car, rather than behind it - of course it is just my personal feeling.
Rank: Racing Permit
#291 Posted : Monday, March 23, 2015 2:15:06 PM(UTC)
^^ to the last 8 or so pages, not anyone in particular
*finally read through it all.

*sigh* and this is why I have given up on this forum.

Anyone actually want to have an intelligent conversation about the physics of driving both in-gin - game and in real life, my gamer tag is shown...

And the guy who replied just before me,
I drive in cockpit on a 24" tv. Yep.
Why?
You don't drive from the bumper in real life ;-)

BUT

When I'm on my own doing rivals-
Rewind/replay - I just make another lap if I mess up = more $$ and XP it seems.
I do use them to get better advantageous viewpoints of the car. Kind of like getting to watch the car, be in the pits, watch cameras, checking tire temps real time - let alone the rest of telemetry - all at once :D

That helps clarify the line I want. And when I get it. I pause the game and take a mental note of what it looks like. And every car is different.

Only car I have even above maybe 15% line memorization in Horizon 2 is my Zagato. Maybe my A - spec BMW 1 Series M.

Also yes, I need a bigger tv lol

Edited by user Monday, March 23, 2015 2:22:19 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Rank: Driver's Permit
#292 Posted : Wednesday, March 25, 2015 6:52:23 AM(UTC)
Thank you! This topic has really interesting information.
Rank: Driver's License
#293 Posted : Friday, August 7, 2015 1:44:44 PM(UTC)
I've been driving for several years in the Forza games... and I'm too timid to play online because I know I'll wreck into folks. I don't mean to - but I'm just not a good driver. I appreciate Jawshe taking the time to write and update this guide, because that's why I got on these forums. I understand why the mods feel this can't be stickied in the General forum - but for the inexperienced driver this was hard to find!

It is also educational to read the differing viewpoints, even in the manner they were presented. Like we say in the Southern US - There's more than one way to skin a cat. I've been doing a lot of driving in FM5 to get the miles and credits to improve my score for this site, and I'm just not very good. Finding this gives me a TON of things to try.

Thank you to all who took the time to post - the good and the bad. Reading this won't do anything without miles of practice, but now at least I'll be changing things to improve instead of just crashing into the same ol' corners.
Rank: Racing Permit
#294 Posted : Saturday, August 8, 2015 7:16:14 PM(UTC)
Awesome post, thank you very much. As a relatively new player in the Forza universe, I can't wait to try these tips when Forza 6 hits in a month!
Rank: Driver's License
#295 Posted : Monday, August 17, 2015 1:48:01 PM(UTC)
I have turned off all assists - and while I like the braking line, it is AMAZING how much more you pay attention to the things on the track without it. In all my years of casually driving around in Forza, I've never used any of the numbered signs prior to the turns. I've started going to the Rivals Time Attack and picking a track and riding it over and over. This helps build up my mileage, affinity level, and skill level all at the same time. It is a completely different game for me.

Soon I'll have to jump into some online racing. I won't win anything (which is ok), but at least I'm much more assured that I won't knock people off the track!
Rank: Driver's Permit
#296 Posted : Tuesday, September 22, 2015 12:30:05 PM(UTC)
Great suggestions - hope I have the time to follow them - wait I do I'm now retired!
Rank: Driver's Permit
#297 Posted : Wednesday, September 23, 2015 8:22:39 AM(UTC)
Well I wouldn't have believed it if I hadn't lived it myself. After reading your tips and then going out to practice yesterday for about 4 hours and back at it today I was amazed at the improvement. Not only were my lap times getting fast each pass but my overall feel improved and I was more confident. I always felt for a player with my limitations "assists" would be necessary, if not critical - WRONG!

After 10 or so laps of frustration it started to get better, don't get me wrong it took about 40 laps before I saw significant improvement, but it was there.

Thank you for your work.

Dark Bawgs
Rank: A-Class Racing License
 1 user liked this post.
User is suspended until 4/12/2045 3:18:22 AM(UTC)
#298 Posted : Sunday, April 17, 2016 7:58:59 PM(UTC)
This should be a sticky post in the FM6 general boards!
@sofa: XBO 1TB + Elite Controller ~ Samsung 65" SUHD curved 3D LED TV ~ 5.1 surround home theatre
@rig: XBO 1TB ~ obutto r3volution ~ Thrustmaster TX + T3PA + TH8A + Leather 28 GT ~ Samsung 50" 3D Plasma TV ~ H&K Soundsticks III
Rank: B-Class Racing License
#299 Posted : Monday, April 25, 2016 1:27:27 PM(UTC)
^^^^^^^
Drifter, Designer!
Leader-Founder 116 Motorsports

Twitch l Flickr
Rank: Driver's License
#300 Posted : Sunday, June 5, 2016 5:41:36 AM(UTC)
Wow! Over two years later and the post still seems to be helping people.

I took a couple years off Forza but picked up Forza 6 and am getting right back to it. Im going to try and repost this in the Forza 6 discussion. Maybe I can get it stickied.

In the meantime, feel free to add my gamertag if you have any questions or just want to talk/chill on forza.

Thanks for all the support guys!
Team AMS - Alien Motorsports - Members: AMS Redline, AMS Sash, AMS Kenpachi, AMS Kustom Dipz, AMS Renta, AMS Matt, AMS Shagga
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