This site uses cookies for analytics and personalized content. By continuing to browse this site, you agree to this use. Learn more
5 Pages1234>>PrevNext
Rank: C-Class Racing License
#26 Posted : Friday, October 23, 2015 12:49:33 PM(UTC)
For those interested I have uploaded my first car pack of 20 tunes see my tune list here:

http://forums.forzamotor...--list-of-all-tunes.aspx
Rank: C-Class Racing License
#27 Posted : Wednesday, October 28, 2015 2:01:44 PM(UTC)
Bump it up.
Rank: Driver's License
 1 user liked this post.
#28 Posted : Friday, October 30, 2015 9:00:43 AM(UTC)
I think your guide is very good and does a very good job with explaining why set certain things. The only piece I don't quite agree with is about the Toe but thats just personal tuning preference. Overall this is a great contribution to the community.

Ioh yeah, also decel 8n RWD cars I run much higher like 60-80, I just dont like the end whipping around on slow completely off throttle turns.
Rank: C-Class Racing License
#29 Posted : Friday, October 30, 2015 3:24:46 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: Biggy Brains Go to Quoted Post
I think your guide is very good and does a very good job with explaining why set certain things. The only piece I don't quite agree with is about the Toe but thats just personal tuning preference. Overall this is a great contribution to the community.

Ioh yeah, also decel 8n RWD cars I run much higher like 60-80, I just dont like the end whipping around on slow completely off throttle turns.


Hey how it going, thanks for your comment. Yea your absolutely right it is about personal preference. Same with accel decel it all depends on your smoothness etc I guess and Assits play a big factor naturally, I run no tcs abs or stb with manual and clutch.
I'm glad you can see the guide potential 😊 hope you have a great evening my friend.
Rank: On the Podium
 1 user liked this post.
#30 Posted : Saturday, October 31, 2015 2:29:15 AM(UTC)
Quote:
(in game front suspension represents 1 wheel as does the rear).


Can you explain a little more how you came to this conclusion? I haven't seen it mentioned in any of the other guides.
Rank: C-Class Racing License
#31 Posted : Saturday, October 31, 2015 3:57:39 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: PJTierney Go to Quoted Post
Quote:
(in game front suspension represents 1 wheel as does the rear).


Can you explain a little more how you came to this conclusion? I haven't seen it mentioned in any of the other guides.


"So if the car weights 3,000 lbs and has a front of 50% it will have an even split front and rear there for you'll have 1,500 lbs Front and Rear, since the 1,500 has to be split between both wheels at the front and rear you then simply divide the 1,500 by 2 which will give you 750 lbs (in game front suspension represents 1 wheel as does the rear)."

Of cause, so when your on your tuning screens when your playing the game and you just spilt the cars weight like I have shown ie 3000lbs by 50% Front you get 1500lbs. If it was a case on the suspension tuning that the front was both wheels and equal to half the cars wieght 1500lbs, then you would find you could not fit 1500lbs on the scale and if you did then the car would be so stiff that it would be undrivable, that's why you split that 1500 by 2.
Hope this helps clear it up for you my friend 😊
Rank: A-Class Racing License
 1 user liked this post.
#32 Posted : Sunday, November 1, 2015 3:39:17 PM(UTC)
Do you mean it represents one axle?

Anyway, I'm new to Forza tuning at detailed level, so I've been trying a few of the baseline methods to find something I like. So far I've liked your methods the most for getting a useable baseline.

Thanks for sharing.
Click to watch Sim and Realword Driving Videos

PC & XB1
Next Level Racing GT Ultimate v2
Fanatec Clubsport: Wheelbase v2.5 | Inverted Pedals v3 | SQ Shifter v1.5 | Universal Hub for XB1
Rank: C-Class Racing License
#33 Posted : Sunday, November 1, 2015 8:05:23 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: RaindancerAU Go to Quoted Post
Do you mean it represents one axle?

Anyway, I'm new to Forza tuning at detailed level, so I've been trying a few of the baseline methods to find something I like. So far I've liked your methods the most for getting a useable baseline.

Thanks for sharing.


Thanks for the kind comment so glad that you've found it useful and helpful ☚n no nothing to do with the axel just the springs in regard to the previous comment
Rank: Driver's Permit
 1 user liked this post.
#34 Posted : Tuesday, November 3, 2015 4:15:51 AM(UTC)
YOU ARE AN AMAZIN HUMAN I SWEAR I MADE IT BECAUSE OF YOU
Rank: Racing Permit
 1 user liked this post.
#35 Posted : Tuesday, November 3, 2015 9:57:59 AM(UTC)
Is there any telemetry info that might indicate ride height too high or too low? Or, what's the sound of the car bottoming out?
Your tuner calcs match to other methods and formulas, so it seems valid.
Shneeb108 / Racing SIM Tools Member
Shneeb
Rank: C-Class Racing License
 1 user liked this post.
#36 Posted : Tuesday, November 3, 2015 10:33:16 AM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: WinterBreezy Go to Quoted Post
YOU ARE AN AMAZIN HUMAN I SWEAR I MADE IT BECAUSE OF YOU


That's amazing dude :) so glad it's working out for people
Rank: C-Class Racing License
#37 Posted : Tuesday, November 3, 2015 10:40:09 AM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: ShneebnaMRR108 Go to Quoted Post
Is there any telemetry info that might indicate ride height too high or too low? Or, what's the sound of the car bottoming out?
Your tuner calcs match to other methods and formulas, so it seems valid.


Telemetry wise not really I mean you can monitor how stiff or soft the springs are but it doesn't help you judge ride hight. You may hear a scraping sound as you bottom out and you can experience sudden loss of speed and/or the ability to steer as you would normally. Keeping a value of 3.5 on ride hight should be good enough for most tracks.
Rank: Racing Permit
 1 user liked this post.
#38 Posted : Tuesday, November 3, 2015 3:47:39 PM(UTC)
Maybe the range of height min to max, divided by some factor?
There has to be some way to do it. The game set up for each car has to have some parameters too.
Kind of puzzling!
Shneeb108 / Racing SIM Tools Member
Shneeb
Rank: C-Class Racing License
#39 Posted : Tuesday, November 3, 2015 9:21:34 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: ShneebnaMRR108 Go to Quoted Post
Maybe the range of height min to max, divided by some factor?
There has to be some way to do it. The game set up for each car has to have some parameters too.
Kind of puzzling!


No I don't believe there is a specific calculation for ride height as it will be different to specific types of track if your tuning track specific, however if you running a stiff setup then ride height can be lower I guess and vise versa higher ride height for softer springs.
For example if your running the Nuremburg Ring, a track with elevations and banks using stiffer springs there would be alot more compression in the springs than normal, so you would want higher than normal ride height to compensate for the extra force being pushed downwards in up and down elevation.
For example again if your running Silverstone or Monza using stiffer springs you can make the ride height lower because those types of circuits have next to no elevations, so this would mean less compression on the springs there for you don't need to compensate with the ride height and you can have them lower.

Hope this make sence, and thanks again for the comments 😊
Rank: Racing Permit
 1 user liked this post.
#40 Posted : Wednesday, November 4, 2015 4:21:31 AM(UTC)
Yes that makes sense, and I guess it is back to a lot of trial and error.
Thanks
Shneeb108 / Racing SIM Tools Member
Shneeb
Rank: C-Class Racing License
#41 Posted : Wednesday, November 4, 2015 9:39:07 AM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: ShneebnaMRR108 Go to Quoted Post
Yes that makes sense, and I guess it is back to a lot of trial and error.
Thanks


Yea pretty much ☚
Rank: Racing Permit
 1 user liked this post.
#42 Posted : Wednesday, November 4, 2015 10:00:08 AM(UTC)
Have you tried tuning the Nissmo yet?
Could be really different!
Shneeb108 / Racing SIM Tools Member
Shneeb
Rank: C-Class Racing License
#43 Posted : Wednesday, November 4, 2015 5:57:32 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: ShneebnaMRR108 Go to Quoted Post
Have you tried tuning the Nissmo yet?
Could be really different!


No not yet but am gona be getting the new DLC tuned up for my next tune pack
Rank: C-Class Racing License
#44 Posted : Thursday, November 5, 2015 11:55:37 PM(UTC)
Bump.
Rank: C-Class Racing License
#45 Posted : Wednesday, November 11, 2015 7:43:26 AM(UTC)
Bump
Rank: Racing Permit
 1 user liked this post.
#46 Posted : Tuesday, November 17, 2015 11:43:27 AM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: PJTierney Go to Quoted Post
Quote:
(in game front suspension represents 1 wheel as does the rear).


Can you explain a little more how you came to this conclusion? I haven't seen it mentioned in any of the other guides.


The F&R spring rates represent a per wheel value, not the rate for the both suspensions (front OR rear), combined.
Take for example a car that weighs 2500pcs, and 43% of its weight is at the front:

FRONT WEIGHT:
2500lbs X .43 = 1075lbs, divided by 2 (suspensions) = 537.5lbs
REAR WEIGHT:
2500lbs X .57 = 1425lbs, divided by 2 = 712.5

You would set your front to 537.5 and the rear to 712.5, not 1075 and 1425.

So...(537.5 X 2) + (712.5 X 2) = 2500lbs

This is not how I set my spring rates (I prefer softer so I decrease both front and rear by a rate of 'X' depending on the vehicle), but just some math to illustrate what the value in the game represents.

Another easy way to set spring rates, is to look at the weight of the car pre/post weight reduction, and adjust spring values by the same percentage.
Example:

Initial weight - 2500lbs
Weight reduction - 300lbs
New weight - 2200lbs

This is a 12% reduction (300lbs/2500lbs)

Adjust (decrease) your spring, rebound, and bump stiffness's by the same percentage.
This will give you a good suspension base tune to start from.
Of course, if you are adding down force, you take a little less percentage off the value(s)...and this is where it becomes tricky because down force is relative to speed...the quicker the speed, the more LBS of down force are exerted on the car.
So in the above example if I were running front and rear wings, that added a total of 300lbs of total down force, I would only subtract about 8% from starting values.

Tuning is a not a hard and fast rule...track, driving style, and car type all play a role.
I run my test drives in Rio...smooth roads, bumpy roads, elevation changes, short turns, sweeping turns...watching the car, feeling how it drives, and looking at the telemetry - these all combine to help you dial in or make finer adjustments.
I will say that finding a perfect tune is impossible...because of the track and environmental variance (racing line is one main example in MP). And so - above all else - assuming you have a good tune...the rest falls on the shoulders of the driver and to a much lesser degree - reliance on the tune of the mechanical parts beneath him (or her). :)

Edited by user Tuesday, November 17, 2015 11:46:05 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Rank: B-Class Racing License
 1 user liked this post.
#47 Posted : Tuesday, November 17, 2015 12:29:44 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: BUCKWILDER Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: PJTierney Go to Quoted Post
Quote:
(in game front suspension represents 1 wheel as does the rear).


Can you explain a little more how you came to this conclusion? I haven't seen it mentioned in any of the other guides.


The F&R spring rates represent a per wheel value, not the rate for the both suspensions (front OR rear), combined.
Take for example a car that weighs 2500pcs, and 43% of its weight is at the front:

FRONT WEIGHT:
2500lbs X .43 = 1075lbs, divided by 2 (suspensions) = 537.5lbs
REAR WEIGHT:
2500lbs X .57 = 1425lbs, divided by 2 = 712.5

You would set your front to 537.5 and the rear to 712.5, not 1075 and 1425.

So...(537.5 X 2) + (712.5 X 2) = 2500lbs

This is not how I set my spring rates (I prefer softer so I decrease both front and rear by a rate of 'X' depending on the vehicle), but just some math to illustrate what the value in the game represents.

Another easy way to set spring rates, is to look at the weight of the car pre/post weight reduction, and adjust spring values by the same percentage.
Example:

Initial weight - 2500lbs
Weight reduction - 300lbs
New weight - 2200lbs

This is a 12% reduction (300lbs/2500lbs)

Adjust (decrease) your spring, rebound, and bump stiffness's by the same percentage.
This will give you a good suspension base tune to start from.
Of course, if you are adding down force, you take a little less percentage off the value(s)...and this is where it becomes tricky because down force is relative to speed...the quicker the speed, the more LBS of down force are exerted on the car.
So in the above example if I were running front and rear wings, that added a total of 300lbs of total down force, I would only subtract about 8% from starting values.

Tuning is a not a hard and fast rule...track, driving style, and car type all play a role.
I run my test drives in Rio...smooth roads, bumpy roads, elevation changes, short turns, sweeping turns...watching the car, feeling how it drives, and looking at the telemetry - these all combine to help you dial in or make finer adjustments.
I will say that finding a perfect tune is impossible...because of the track and environmental variance (racing line is one main example in MP). And so - above all else - assuming you have a good tune...the rest falls on the shoulders of the driver and to a much lesser degree - reliance on the tune of the mechanical parts beneath him (or her). :)


I agree 100%, IMO you can over think and make tuning more difficult than what it is, the key is your build, driving skills and or car with a specific track. There is (as you said) no perfect tune.

Edited by user Tuesday, November 17, 2015 1:33:10 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

DRIVE FAST OR DON'T BOTHER DRIVING....
PTG W4RLOCK
WWW.PENDULUMTUNING.PROBOARDS.COM
Twitter @ptg_w4rlock
Rank: A-Class Racing License
 1 user liked this post.
#48 Posted : Tuesday, November 17, 2015 1:08:55 PM(UTC)
pretty good advice for a base tune. A little vague on the build portion of the writeup.

Also may want to break the section down in tyres on the build. U said you try to always use race tyres, but this is actually pretty poor advice in the lower classes. Up until around A class unless going for an all out grip build rarely do I use race tyres. They eat up way too much pi.

PTG Home

Race Team
Tester
Tuner
Rank: C-Class Racing License
#49 Posted : Tuesday, November 17, 2015 10:02:25 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: PTG Baby Cow Go to Quoted Post
pretty good advice for a base tune. A little vague on the build portion of the writeup.

Also may want to break the section down in tyres on the build. U said you try to always use race tyres, but this is actually pretty poor advice in the lower classes. Up until around A class unless going for an all out grip build rarely do I use race tyres. They eat up way too much pi.


That's fair comment, thanks for your input. That is somthing I will take in to consideration and possibly change, you are of course absolutely right with the lower classes. I do use race tyres alot in A Class and above and not so much lower than that. Maybe I neglected that a little as I do mostly A and above and very little lower.
Thanks again 😊
Rank: C-Class Racing License
#50 Posted : Tuesday, November 17, 2015 10:24:21 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: BUCKWILDER Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: PJTierney Go to Quoted Post
Quote:
(in game front suspension represents 1 wheel as does the rear).


Can you explain a little more how you came to this conclusion? I haven't seen it mentioned in any of the other guides.


The F&R spring rates represent a per wheel value, not the rate for the both suspensions (front OR rear), combined.
Take for example a car that weighs 2500pcs, and 43% of its weight is at the front:

FRONT WEIGHT:
2500lbs X .43 = 1075lbs, divided by 2 (suspensions) = 537.5lbs
REAR WEIGHT:
2500lbs X .57 = 1425lbs, divided by 2 = 712.5

You would set your front to 537.5 and the rear to 712.5, not 1075 and 1425.

So...(537.5 X 2) + (712.5 X 2) = 2500lbs

This is not how I set my spring rates (I prefer softer so I decrease both front and rear by a rate of 'X' depending on the vehicle), but just some math to illustrate what the value in the game represents.

Another easy way to set spring rates, is to look at the weight of the car pre/post weight reduction, and adjust spring values by the same percentage.
Example:

Initial weight - 2500lbs
Weight reduction - 300lbs
New weight - 2200lbs

This is a 12% reduction (300lbs/2500lbs)

Adjust (decrease) your spring, rebound, and bump stiffness's by the same percentage.
This will give you a good suspension base tune to start from.
Of course, if you are adding down force, you take a little less percentage off the value(s)...and this is where it becomes tricky because down force is relative to speed...the quicker the speed, the more LBS of down force are exerted on the car.
So in the above example if I were running front and rear wings, that added a total of 300lbs of total down force, I would only subtract about 8% from starting values.

Tuning is a not a hard and fast rule...track, driving style, and car type all play a role.
I run my test drives in Rio...smooth roads, bumpy roads, elevation changes, short turns, sweeping turns...watching the car, feeling how it drives, and looking at the telemetry - these all combine to help you dial in or make finer adjustments.
I will say that finding a perfect tune is impossible...because of the track and environmental variance (racing line is one main example in MP). And so - above all else - assuming you have a good tune...the rest falls on the shoulders of the driver and to a much lesser degree - reliance on the tune of the mechanical parts beneath him (or her). :)


Thank you for your contribution to the post my friend, much appreciated 😊
5 Pages1234>>PrevNext

Notification

Icon
Error