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Rank: B-Class Racing License
#51 Posted : Tuesday, March 8, 2016 8:41:30 AM(UTC)
Agreed, the only question is: what are the certain car types exactly? Engine and drivetrain is obviously an important aspect but also if your running a modern sports car or an old muscle car.

My best bet would be that cars with the same engine / drive and within the same division share the same suspension model, i.e. tune settings should work similar. Talking about a tune profile / base tune that works across.

Another question: besides that how do aero or roll cage change the tune profile for a specific car? E.g. from my experience roll cage adds stiffness in its own right, requiring a softer tune in relation to stock chassis. For aero vs. non-aero however I didn't noticed a difference yet in terms of base tune.

Edited by user Tuesday, March 8, 2016 8:42:32 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Rank: Racing Permit
#52 Posted : Sunday, June 12, 2016 12:28:12 AM(UTC)
One thing Im going to test tonight after I get home, is having a higher profile tyre on cars and running stiffer suspension (using the tyres as quasi suspension - ala Formula 1).

It will be interesting to see if it does or doesnt make a difference (and assuming I can run a smaller wheel/higher profile set up).

Rank: Driver's Permit
#53 Posted : Tuesday, December 6, 2016 5:57:36 PM(UTC)
THE REAL WAY TO SET CAMBER!

finish tuning your car, this should be your last step.

Pick a speed you want your car to corner most optimally...
40 mph, 70, 110, etc., whatever you prefer.

Go to the big airfield test track

Drive in a circle at the speed you chose. Maintain a constant speed.

Bring up telemetry screen that shows camber.

If your driving to the left, your right side should read neg or pos because of the flex of the suspension. If its neg add a few points pos and vice versa. The goal is to achieve 0 degree camber UNDER LOAD. this results in a straight up and down tire.

The point is to have the FULL area of the tire touching the pavement. Camber is meant to counterct the flex of the suspension.

Forza is an incredibly realistic sim...

Mastakilla253

Rank: B-Class Racing License
#54 Posted : Thursday, February 2, 2017 4:08:45 AM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: MastaKilla253 Go to Quoted Post
THE REAL WAY TO SET CAMBER!

finish tuning your car, this should be your last step.

Pick a speed you want your car to corner most optimally...
40 mph, 70, 110, etc., whatever you prefer.

Go to the big airfield test track

Drive in a circle at the speed you chose. Maintain a constant speed.

Bring up telemetry screen that shows camber.

If your driving to the left, your right side should read neg or pos because of the flex of the suspension. If its neg add a few points pos and vice versa. The goal is to achieve 0 degree camber UNDER LOAD. this results in a straight up and down tire.

The point is to have the FULL area of the tire touching the pavement. Camber is meant to counterct the flex of the suspension.

Forza is an incredibly realistic sim...

Mastakilla253


Don't agree on tuning camber late in the process.

Wrong camber can cause all kind of issues while cornering so you will try to dial out those issues with other tuning parts like ARBs, springs, dampers etc. while the cause of the problem is wrong camber.

Rank: Driver's Permit
#55 Posted : Tuesday, March 14, 2017 1:30:29 AM(UTC)
Can anyone please tell me why some leaderboard cars have like 20" rims on the front and standard on the rear?
Rank: On the Podium
#56 Posted : Wednesday, March 15, 2017 6:47:38 AM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: Deagle Dow Go to Quoted Post
Can anyone please tell me why some leaderboard cars have like 20" rims on the front and standard on the rear?


Helps the car turn better. It increases the amount of tire on surface.

Larger rear rims make some builds skittish. Generally the less weight in the rear the more likely the rear will be slippery with big rear rims. Generally this technique works best on lightweight acceleration tunes and all out power tunes for Lemans as an example. Trial and error really. If I would have to guess, it would be the lack of tire flex in the rear that causes the skittish feeling. Basically not enough rubber for the car to lean on when weight transfer to the rear on acceleration. Similar in concept as to why dragsters have huge rear tires.
Rank: Driver's Permit
#57 Posted : Friday, May 5, 2017 5:47:25 PM(UTC)
This is great, I'm very interested in making my R32 the track time beast I needs to be. Copying and pasting this into somewhere I can read it on the go while playing forza later this afternoon.
Rank: Driver's License
#58 Posted : Thursday, July 6, 2017 8:05:56 AM(UTC)
Hey guys and gals,
I have been out of the loop for a while. I used to use this guide a lot, I even printed it out. Lol

But when I played last on FM4, there was a formula that I was using to balance my car out as a blank slate. The extreme version of it is mentioned in this very old/updated guide. And it's in my printed out version from the FM4 forums. But I can't find the original version.

It was an awesome starting place. You'd input weights, distribution, maxs & mins, aero, etc... I love it. I even made an excel spreadsheet, saved it to Google drive....... Deleted it? Idk but it's gone.

If you could help. Thanks.
Rank: Driver's Permit
#59 Posted : Thursday, September 14, 2017 3:02:22 PM(UTC)
How do you get to the upgrade menu in forza 6?
Rank: Driver's Permit
#60 Posted : Monday, February 19, 2018 5:07:25 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: BIG W0RM 80 Go to Quoted Post





can some one explain all of thoses cornor types and what they are i have no idea what a slalom or a full throttle is etc the only one that i think i know is the slow cornor one dose it mean entering a cornor going very slowly?



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